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Last is Joanne McNeill presenting a short story made from what they meant as a memoir but she could recall no details. So they left a lot of blanks in the text. They hoped they'd remember. But never did, so just filled them in with fiction

The rewriting of the past is also thematic, because the social media that it mostly takes place on is currently engaged in rewriting its early history. Mostly getting away with it cos there weren't many users

Title: "Lurk"

newborderballads.com Scots ballads generated by a recursive neural network with backtracking, plus some custom Tracery for the proper names so it's more storylike

Rhyme detection uses an algorithm developed by the US navy in the 70s, no clue why they cared

Can you do that on text? You can, using traditional poetry meters like sonnets. They implemented this github.com/mewo2/oisin

Actually sonnets don't work all that great. Until you feed them a GameFAQs walkthrough as a corpus

The current state of the art in generative art is sort of like chicken nuggets. No internal structure

But we can give it external structure, like chicken nuggets in the shape of dinosaurs

Start with eg. a Markov chain and add wave function collapse. It's just constraint satisfaction like the previous but you can do it on images and, like, draw half an image, get the computer to draw the other half

Here's Martin O'Leary @mewo2 mewo.com

Title: Reconstituted Text

Spoiler warnings for Final Fantasy VII disc 1

The bot, then, is a constraint solving problem within whatever frame you've set up

You have to construct the right frame for your particular problem-space

For more info, see her talk tomorrow at the CUNY NLP reading group. She's trying to automate the process of frame generation from a corpus!

What if you made a bot like that with semantics as well as phonetics? Then you get the concept of lexical frames

It's like object oriented programming for words

First feature presenter is @eseyffarth who's getting a PhD in computational linguistics and does lots of twitter bots @ojahn@twitter.com

Title: From Frame to Text Generation

First let's talk about the strategy of goofing off until you get a good bot idea

Example: @check_out_my_band

Made with @aparrish 's Wordnik API and the pronouncingpy Python module

@nickmofo is the final open projector presenter, with a talk about what literature would be like after the technological singularity
It went too fast but here are the slides nickm.com/if/montfort__literat

A poet named Kit Armstrong made a poem with an autocomplete tool trained on this corpus, and actually got it accepted to a literature journal, which is cool

@aparrish imagines lots of other uses of this, in the same way there are many uses for limestone, which is formed from the bones of our ancestors

Now it's @aparrish

A Project Gutenberg Poetry Corpus github.com/aparrish/gutenberg-

She got every line of public domain poetry from Project Gutenberg and put it in one big file to make it easier to work with, normalized text encodings etc

first made github.com/aparrish/gutenberg- which is just a mirror of Project Gutenberg with a more consistent schema, then filtered it to poetry and random walked it

Fernando Ramallo presents

An economics poem where you perform labor as both the worker and the CEO

The CEO's labor is tweeting. It affects the stock price a lot

Ryu gets all existential describing ordinary chores in fighting game terms about spacing and such

Blanka doesn't reply, and this causes Ryu sorrow, and then Blanka eats his face off. End

But first, open projector

Tom is going first even tho he's the MC cos he's the "sacrifice" to make everyone else feel more secure

He's playing Street Fighter 2 only Ryu is talking to Blanka instead of really fighting

The voice is cheesy text to speech

"When the tournament is over, do you feel a sense of purpose, or do you finally relax?"

"I have fought this group of fighters so many times. I can simulate every reaction in my mind" and the stage switches a bunch

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Babycastles Mastodon

This is an instance for Babycastles, the Manhattan based videogames art collective. We host open co-working every Monday, WordHack every third Thursday of the month, and lots of other events, viewable on our calendar.